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  • Special Episode: Best and Worst of 2016 February 17, 2017

    Best Of

    In this episode your hosst discuss the new releases of 2016, their favorite selections, their least favorite selections, and a number of honorary mentions.

    Podcast hosts: Matthew Balz, Jason Callen, and Jacob Mouradian.

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  • Episode 73: Manchester by the Sea January 12, 2017

    Podcast Logo + Poster

    In this episode your hosts discuss director Kenneth Longergan’s directorial career, Casey Affleck’s career and controversy, and compassionate characters. The Episode Theme is home invasions, inspired by our review of Elle.

    Podcast hosts: Matthew Balz, Jason Callen, and Jacob Mouradian.

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Latest Trailer

  • “A Cure for the Wellness” trailer December 20, 2016

     

    Director: Gore Verbinski

    Starring: Dane DeHaan, Jason Isaacs, Mia Goth

    Synopsis: An aspiring executive ventures out to the Swiss Alps to retrieve his company’s CEO from a health facility, but discovers that there are unsettling secrets within the facility’s operations.

    Notes: Gore Verbinski has always impressed me with the way he can transform a script through style and atmosphere, such as how he innovated the horror genre with the dreary unnerving mood of The Ring, the swashbuckling period adventure of The Pirates of the Caribbean, or even the ridiculously satisfying slapstick stage comedy in Moushunt. The story here of an outsider investigating a secluded community of would-be captors and would-be captives is not new (the most vivid example would be the unanimously disappointing Shutter Island) but with Verbinski at the helm we are guaranteed nothing short of a viscerally engrossing experience told in gripping visuals and dedicated characters.

  • “The Handmaiden” trailer May 3, 2016


    Director: Chan-wook Park

    Starring: Jung-woo Ha, Min-hee Kim, Jin-woong Jo

    Synopsis: Under the 1930s occupation of Korea, a girl schemes to steal the fortunes of a wealthy Japanese family whom she serves.

    Notes: By this time, Chan-wook Park needs no introduction. He’s situated his stories in international cultures and turned your everyday objects into devices of nightmares. His films compose an atmosphere of subtle dread before orchestrating blatant but satisfying awe. Unlike other projects, this time around his film is based a novel, Fingersmith by Sarah Waters, so we’ll have a chance to see his influence on pre-existing source material. If anything, his style will only be strengthened with these new ideas and established content to play with.


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